Why must I always have justify my ability to work as a disabled person?

 I will hold my hands up and admit that being able to work, to show my intelligence and other abilties, is very important to my personhood and therefore my mental wellbeing. Being paid is nice and essential for living, but it does not match the sense of achievement working provides me.Before I go further I … Continue reading Why must I always have justify my ability to work as a disabled person?

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We should push disabled people to achieve their potential

We should have the same expectations of people with impairments as we have for everyone else. If paid employment is not the end goal, than it is the means to enjoying other aspects of life. It should not be a case of wanting to work, but more about having a responsibility to work, and reaching your full potential. While I am aware that the practicalities of doing this is not fully in place currently, we should ensure that the right attitude exists, which I believe is not the case.

I am proud to say that work has set me free

In the last few months, a number of welfare activists have linked the term 'work sets you free' with the government's welfare reforms. This term is regarded as sinister because in german the term is translated as 'arbeit macht frei', which was painted onto the entrances of Nazi concentration camps. The inference is that the government … Continue reading I am proud to say that work has set me free

When did asking a disabled person to take responsibility for their actions become a crime?

It is generally assumed that the way to improve the inclusion of sick and disabled people is to focus on providing them access to rights. However, rights simply exist, they are passive and meaningless without responsibilities. Anti-discrimination 'civil rights' legislation, like the original 'Disability Discrimination Act 1995' is really about the right to take responsibility … Continue reading When did asking a disabled person to take responsibility for their actions become a crime?

Disabled People Can Work, Rest and Play

I might be showing my age when I say I remember the Mars bar advertising slogan "a Mars a day lets you work, rest and play" but I think it is a perfect way of describing what a balanced lifestyle is, in terms of mental wellbeing. I would like to propose that disabled people need … Continue reading Disabled People Can Work, Rest and Play

We Must Expect More From Disabled People

I think one of my biggest frustrations with society in terms of disability is the naturally low expectations the public has for what disabled people can and indeed should achieve. While everyone talks about the equality of disabled people, the reality is we are perceived as inferior beings, less capable of achieving what most people … Continue reading We Must Expect More From Disabled People

Changing the Conversation on Disability

The politics of disability used to be about achieving equality and inclusion as contributing citizens but in 2010 the welfare reforms changed everything. The charities, supported by a whole host of new generation sick and disabled activists have ripped up the equality agenda and replaced it with a list of demands that see disabled people … Continue reading Changing the Conversation on Disability

Is Solidarity an Excuse for Disabled People Not to Work?

As someone who was born with cerebral palsy, I discovered the old 'disability movement' when I went to University at 18 in 1992. I quickly saw this unelected and unaccountable body as a way for a minority to dictate to the majority. I quickly understood the Solidarity others find so precious was actually quite oppressive. … Continue reading Is Solidarity an Excuse for Disabled People Not to Work?