When did promoting inclusion become a hate crime?


I have suggested for a few years that what is now considered the mainstream ‘disability movement’, made popular in the same context as Corbyn, are focused on the exclusion and by default, eugenics, of people with impairments. This is a strong allegation but two events in the last seven days have confirmed to me that my concerns are well founded.

The first event is when Liz Carr, a television actress with impairments and well-known activist, at a Labour Party conference fringe meeting, compared supporting people with impairments into employment with sending then to Nazi concentration camps! She then went on to explain how being a ‘disabled person’ in 2016 Britain meant you were hated and vilified by the government’s workshy and benefit scrounger rhetoric.

Now, there may be a valid reason to raise concerns about how people are being tested by WCA, but the idea of people being vilified is another issue and certainly not what it seems. The reality is the whole ‘benefit scrounger’ rhetoric was created by activists to combat the pro-inclusion agenda.

The means that activists like Liz will accuse anyone who supports people with impairment’s meaningful inclusion into society as labelling them as benefit scroungers, and so reinforcing a politically correct notion that excluding people with impairments is the only right way to think, especially when you may be a target of online abuse if you do not.

The idea that promoting inclusion is a hate crime has become so mainstream that even the government has been forced to take a step back, leading the 2nd event of the week. This is the proposed scrapping of WCA reassessments where the level of impairment makes it ‘pointless’.

This sounds a good idea in some cases although there is a sinister implication to it. It means for young adults with lifelong conditions that they will only be assessed once when they are 18 and basically left to rot unsupported for the rest of their lives, sitting at home doing nothing as nothing is expected from them. And as I warned many times before, this culture can only increase the rise in eugenic thinking.

There is also likely to be a growing list of impairment labels which will be automatically excluded from reassessments and ultimately assessments, fought for by charities like Scope and National Autistic Society, who welcome this exclusion policy. Endless pity campaigns about this or that condition will grow the list of people with impairments excluded from society simply to please middle-class prejudices.

If Labour is elected, when pigs start flying, and they do scrap WCA, then I fear there will be a secret and informal 2 tier system regarding the employment opportunities offered to people with impairments based on this list. This means under both systems, a ‘profoundly incurable’ person like myself will find themselves sitting on a state issued bean bag for most of their life doing nothing, simply because of the prejudices of others.

When the modern disability movement hates real and meaningful inclusion and needs to frame it ‘as the enemy’, what a mess we have gotten ourselves in to. But it is a part of the selfish society we now live in, where no one wants to take responsibility for their actions. Inclusion is hard work so why bother is the attitude of those who are happy to play the vulnerable victim if it gets them the cash they want without working for it like others do.

Inclusion must include a conversation about paid employment as this is at the heart of any post-industrial society whether it is a capitalist or socialist system. Assuming in 2016 that people with impairments must sit on the sidelines throughout their life living on handouts because they are naturally inferior is as backwards as the social roles we assumed for women and others in the past. Those who celebrate exclusion are a danger to people with impairments who require challenging to stop a long term solution offered by eugenics.

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